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E75 GUEST Megan Knepp founder of Bold Outdoors chats self-defense, 2nd ammendment rights, sex trafficking and QANON

· qanon,self defense,second ammendment,megan knepp,sex trafficking

Michaela:

Megan. It is so awesome to have you on the podcast after our big snafu earlier this week. I'm so excited to have you. Well, it's good to be here. I'm excited to be here. And just for full disclosure for the audience, we had a great half hour conversation that didn't record earlier this week. So we are redoing this podcast today.

Megan:

Yeah...

It really was.

Michaela: And I find it so ironic that we were having the dialogue we were having. And then it's like the first time in the history of this podcast, 70 some odd episodes that I've had that happen. It was so odd. Yeah. So it was weird very much. So can you share with the audience a little bit about you, um, share with us what you've got going on with bold outdoors, and you're also a turning point ambassador. Can you tell us a little bit about what you've got going on? Absolutely. Um, I am 32. I'm from South Florida. I was born and raised here. Um, my family were farmers back in Southern Indiana, so it was kind of like, I've always been a big avid outdoors and then it's just kind of run in my blood from both sides of my family. Um, kind of, I guess, bulled outdoors originated.

Megan:

I've always had this spot in my heart, a long story short for, uh, kids with cancer. Um, I've always been very active, lived a very active lifestyle. Um, just with sports. I played sports all my life. Um, I played competitively, I played on tour. Um, I'm fishing, hunting, hiking, horseback riding, um, wakeboarding, just very active. And, um, I've never taken that for granted. Like it's just always been a huge blessing in my life and I'm very thankful for that. And, uh, so when I see kids, when I see these little I'm in little kids just bound to these hospital beds and, um, they're just kind of wrapped up in, in hospitals and treatment and immobilized and all these things and it's absolutely just breaks my heart. And, uh, so I was just kind of, you know, God just laid on the heart to how, how can I tie my love for the outdoors and, uh, kind of give back to that community or organization.

Megan:

And, uh, I just thought, you know, I'm gonna, I'm gonna live bold, you know, walk boldly in my faith. And, um, I'm gonna, you know, basically our mission statement is to reveal about division through the great outdoors. And, uh, it's, it's just, you know, if you're an outdoors person, you know, you, it's hard to, to be outside and not take it all in or kind of see God's presence just all around us. I mean, the earth is so gorgeous and I'm so blessed to live in America. I think we have one of the most diverse countries and, uh, it's just, it's really cool. So, um, 20% of whatever we sell online goes straight towards a local family that has, is battling that has a child that's battling cancer. Um, we were just spent time, uh, sponsoring Clayton. Uh, he was three and a half years old. He was diagnosed with stage four neuroblastoma. Um, and he was with us for a year and a half and he was in remission for a while and ended up losing his battle, um, last August. So, um, it's just, it's just been really, really great. It's, it's been a blessing getting to know these kids, um, getting to impact them and, and getting other people involved and, and donating and just kind of being able to impact these kids' lives. And I honestly think they've been impacted mine and, and others more, more than the alternative. So

Michaela:

As you were talking, I was trying to input something, but I found myself with this huge lump in my throat, trying to just swallow it down. It's just a devastating concept and thought that, um, you know, I'm a mom to a nine year old and to think of an, you know, precious three year old or four year old or any age child really, um, going through that. And I, I get so much life and encouragement about life by watching my son. And we're very outdoorsy. We do a lot of high gain and, uh, Lake activity is like, you're talking about ocean activities. And, um, so, so that just really kind of brought my emotions all bubbling up to the surface. And, and honestly lately with the way the world is right now, I think that it doesn't take much for me to get to that space of just feeling kind of utterly devastated or heartbroken.

Michaela:

Um, you know, one of the things I was thinking about as you were talking is how I've done so much research lately, and I have a fully Vaxxed child I'm fully Vaxxed, but, um, uh, about what vaccines, uh, have within them, um, notably Roundup and, um, yeah, you know, I've been, I've been on this journey for a couple of months now of really questioning a lot of information that I've been getting from mainstream media and asking, but why, but why? And this one, and this isn't even something that we talked about earlier this week, but is this one is a big one is why is Roundup, which is a known carcinogen in vaccines that we are giving to infants. Um, and I, I almost couldn't believe it when I first started researching it and I'm like, they don't even hide it. It is right in plain that they are putting round up in infant vaccines.

Michaela:

And then of course we wonder why these children have these terrible cancers at such a young age. Like how could they have been exposed to anything there there's their children, you know? And, uh, now I'm just getting all these big aha moments. And, and one of the reasons that I I'm so honored to have you, and then I wanted to bring you on this podcast is that one of the things that I've been feeling lately is this great call to bring awareness and insight to the idea that we've been fed a narrative for a very long time and now more than ever, it is important for, you know, all humans, especially moms, um, women too, step outside your comfort zone and start asking question and start asking, but why challenge the narrative do research on alternative search engines, like a kosha.org to try to educate yourself before going along with the mainstream, because, um, it's been really eye opening.

Michaela:

What's been unfolding for me, especially. And, uh, that's how I originally connected with you was that you were being outspoken on concepts of, uh, human trafficking, sex trafficking and, and the terrors and awfulness. That's going along with that. So, um, I appreciate you for being bold and for having the courage cause I'll tell you what, and I know I'm doing a lot of talking here, but, um, I mentioned to you earlier this week, we were down in the Bay area. We live in a rural town in our bubble. We're kind of like removed from everything. We went to the Bay area. We were having a very lighthearted family conversation at an outdoor table. Laughter's the best medicine we were joking about the pandemic, just kind of bringing light to everything. And a guy walked by our table as he and his significant other relieving and looked at me and said, you are killing the world.

Michaela:

You are the reason people are dying of COVID. And I was so appalled and mind blown. I actually set my Instagram to private within moments of that, because I've just felt this utter sense of, Oh my gosh, this world is so divisive right now. And so ugly and, you know, perfectly kind, people are becoming perfectly ugly with what is going on. And I didn't want to suddenly feel like efficient fishbowl for my thoughts, my beliefs, and for challenging the narrative. Um, so I really commend you for, for being able to speak out because I'm only as much as I've got this podcast with, you know, tens of thousands of listeners every week. My voice is relatively silent when it comes to what my heart really believes sometimes on some of these things for fear out of fear. Um, and I'm just finding a space to be able to talk about these things.

Michaela:

Um, one of the things I've shared on this podcast is I'm a very hippie mom. I love animals. I'm all for nature. Um, you know, all things organic sustaining, growing my own veggies, but I also, I have a concealed carry permit. I am not afraid to use my gun if I need to defend my family. And I think that a lot of women have found themselves. And I'd love to get into this conversation with you in this space of feeling like I cannot be a hippy mom or a hippie woman or an organic woman and brandish a gun. And that is not true. That that is what the mainstream would like you to believe that you have to choose. You have to pick a label. You can't be both. Can you talk a little to that? I know you're big on second amendment rights. Um, I know you are very confident in sharing the importance of self defense. Can you talk a little to that and share that with the listeners?

Megan:

Absolutely. Um, like, like I said, I was born and raised in outdoors. We, you know, grew a lot of our own fruits and veggies, just like you said, and we've always harvested our own meat, um, deer we've raised cattle, you know, our own beef, all organic, just, just because, I mean, it's, it's just nice to know. I mean, we process our own meat, everything we do ourselves. It's just nice to know like what you're putting in your body and that everything is organic. Everything is, is natural and, and all those, all those things. And then along with that, you know, you, you appreciate it more when, when you're doing it yourself. And, uh, so I, I can relate to that way of life and I commend it. You know, I think there's a lot to be said for, for that way of living. And, um, with that being said, like we were always, when we were sent out into the woods, um, I'm a big bow Hunter and we never, we never went into the woods.

Megan:

We never went hiking. We never did anything unless we were carrying, you know, I mean, there's mountain lions, we've run into Bobcat's. I've had coyotes circling my tree when I've been up in my tree stand and they wouldn't let me down. And, um, there's just, there's been a lot of, I was, um, I worked on a ranch in Montana where we took guests on trail rides and, uh, you just there's mountain lions is you never know what you could run into. You never, you just never know. So I think it's so important that we use our right to bear arms. I mean, we have a second amendment for a reason. They gave that to us. Um, I think I very much stress the importance of knowledge about that. I mean, I've, I've had, I don't know how many people it's been crazy. How many people have messaged me privately over the past two or three months asking, you know, I, I know you're into this. How do I, how do I obtain a permit? How can I conceal carry? Uh, what, what gun do you shoot? And I'm like, it's not about me. It's not about what I shoot. It's it's you, what you

Michaela:

Feel comfortable doing. You've gotta be confident in that. You've got to know the rules, you've got to know how to shoot it. You've got it. There's just so much behind it. And, um, like I said, it's, it's just being confident in that and knowing how to use it. And I think you bring up such a good point that it is very, I mean, you know, especially with the concealing carry in California, there's a very heavy burden that comes along with that responsibility of, you know, knowing where your weapon is at all times, knowing how to use your weapon, knowing how to DRM your weapon, knowing how to protect your weapon from children and other people who could use your weapon against you. There's a lot that goes into it. And it's a very empowering thing. And I think that people have this notion that, you know, guns just kill well, that, that, that is a true statement.

Michaela:

However, they can also be the deciding factor between you and your child and someone else. And that for me, was the switching point was I used to tell my husband, if somebody tries to rob us, I'm going to run. I can hit the highway in two seconds, I've run marathons. I've thought, you know, and, and as soon as my son came along, I realized that I had this other life to defend. And that it was, it was naive of me to think that I would be able to manage that if somebody else had a weapon and I didn't. And that was when I started to realize that it was really important for me to educate myself. I was terrified the first time I held a gun, I mean, and I grew up in a family of hunters. So I grew up around guns, but I, but I was a hippie chick.

Michaela:

And I was like, nah, not my gig, not my bag. Um, I liked, I liked the ignorance of not knowing where my food came from and that sort of thing. Now, now that being said, I'm pescatarian, if we're going to label it. I said, I don't, but that doesn't, it doesn't matter here nor there. Um, I catch my own fish that I eat. And so I definitely kill, you know, I, I've definitely experienced that. My husband tells a hilarious story to this day. Um, the first time when we were just dating, he took me up to Alaska. His parents live up there and we went fishing and I was, so the fishing was so fun. Like the fishing part was so fun, but the minute I caught a fish, um, we were with this guy, they called him the high tech redneck and in a very, not, you know, just in a very fun lighthearted way. And he took this big metal bat and smacked the salmon over the head. And I mean, I just started balling and all of the guys froze and they all kind of looked at my husband now. And they were like, Oh, you know, and, and then I wiped my tears and I go, can we do it again?

Michaela:

She wasn't good. And so I've killed thousands of fish now probably because they feed my family. They nourished us, they sustain us and I'm okay with that. But, um, yeah. So when I started to kind of get involved in shooting, I was doing it for self defense. And, um, you know, I was working as a therapist with, with some crazy people, um, getting off work late at night, things like that, and just started realizing that, you know, even just walking to my car, you know, my aunt has the very traumatic story of, of something awful that happened to her in a parking garage, walking to her car at night. And, um, so I just started to realize that it was important and I was terrified the first time I really handled a gun. Um, like you said, I found that fit for me. It, it, you know, I wanted a revolver. I wanted to see the bullets. I wanted to know what was happening. Um, and my husband would be so upset with me for calling them bullets because they're cartridges. But, um, it's an empowering way to live, to know that you can defend yourself. How do you feel about women who may be, are afraid of taking that first step? What would you say to them about like, they've never grown up around guns? You know, all they know is they could discharge at any time and kill somebody. Like, what do you say to that?

Megan:

It's in, you know, I've, I've had a lot of people I've coached a lot of women. I've coached a lot of girls, um, in the, in gun knowledge gun. Um, just the more, you know, because everyone everyone's fearful of, of what they don't know or what they're not familiar with. So I encourage them to familiarize yourselves. You know, if you don't have the opportunity we've had land, we've always had a place to go, just shoot and a target practice. But, you know, there's, there are gun ranges around there's indoor ranges, um, get, get a hold of someone that does know what they're doing, get a hold of, um, a trainer or, you know, they're, they're all over the United States. Um, seek, seek somebody out a professional, um, get with them, help, just ask them to train you, look, you know, like, I don't know anything.

Megan:

I've never, I've never even held a gun before. I don't know what I'm doing. People are more than willing to help you learn and to make you comfortable and confident and, um, in knowledge and, and just to educate and train yourself, like I said, you know, it's, it's very important to, to know what you're doing to the safety safety that comes with guns, because yes they are, you know, it's scary. If you don't know what you're doing, it's scary. If you do know what you're doing, you just, you always, you can never be too careful. And like, in those situations, you know, heaven forbid you ever have to use it. You know, that's, that would be my absolute last resort. Like nobody ever wants to use a gun. You know, that's not why we have them. It's just, it's just knowing that you can protect yourself knowing that you are capable of saving your life or somebody else's your child's. Um, you know, it's, it's just knowing that and having the confidence to, um, to take a stand when that situation heaven forbid, if that would ever come into play,

Michaela:

You, you bring up such a good point that owning a weapon doesn't mean you intend to kill somebody, owning a weapon means that you intend to defend yourself if you need to. And I think a lot of times it's not, it's not taught that way. It's taught that it's a killing thing rather than a defense thing. And I, and I really wish that that stereotype would go away because I have never once ever considered using my weapon. And I am thankful because if I've considered using my weapon, it means somebody was damn near about to kill me or my family. And so I think that's an important distinguishment that, you know, just because you have your weapon doesn't mean that you ever intend to use it. That being said, I still target practice and stay current because, you know, I find that if I haven't shot my weapon in awhile, I am a little rusty. It, I, it's not like you forget, but you're not as not quite as on target as

Megan:

Right. Yep. And those situations, if, I mean, like I said, God forbid that ever happened. You know, your heart's racing, you're panicking. You're, you know, your mind's racing. And so even, I mean, I've done training so much to where, like I'm climbing up ladders, running sprints, I'm doing pushups. And then I have to grab my gun and shoot a bullseye. You know, you have to factor in your hands, shaking being out of breath, your, your heart's racing, you know, all of those factors, like there's so many ways to train. So that when that, if, like I said, I wouldn't read that would ever happen. Your, you know, how to react.

Michaela:

Yeah. And it sort of becomes like a second nature. Yeah. You know, um, one of the things that I was thinking about as you were talking is that, um, they often say when you're like getting a CCW, for example, that people, um, you know, they're not prepared for how your body is in fight or flight mode, full adrenaline pumping and all that's going on there. So if you bring up a good point that if you can go to one of those training centers that at least tries to throw your body into that situation, that's even better. We had a friend that said, I'm going to come to your house in the middle of the night. My husband was like, please don't do that because you will probably want, but you know, his point was that's when you need to train. As in the middle of the night, um, earlier in the podcast, I said, I've, I've killed a lot of fish.

Michaela:

And I want to back up a little bit, because I do have a lot of hippie listeners that were probably like, Oh my God. But, but the truth of it is I heart. I have harvested a lot of fish. Um, you, and, and, and that's a better term, I think for, you know, the fact that I'm not killing just to kill, we are killing, to sustain, to eat and our freezer fill our freezer for the next year, year and a half or whatever. And we don't kill anything that we don't intend to eat. So I just want us to back that up. Cause I thought I might've just spurred a lot of triggers and people say, that's a great point. I mean, every, I mean, I get a very, very bad rep and I get, I've gotten, I don't know how many death threats on my Instagram and on public forums, you know, labeling me as a killer.

Michaela:

And I'm just like, this is the way I was raised. We'd never, my parents never, ever taught me that we're, we're killing just to kill anything we've ever shot. Um, bow and arrow rifle, whatever it may be like with everything is put to use everything, everything we, everything is harvested. So we're eating what we feel. We're not eating it. We're not killing it type thing. You know, it true that way of life story. When my brother was little, he shot a squirrel with his BB gun and my grandpa made him put that thing on the grill to eat it.

Michaela:

I knew like I remember being mortified by the whole thing, but now as an adult, I completely understand like why he did that and what that was about. And I think that, um, I think that's important than I think a lot of people, you know, go to the grocery store, they go to the barbecue, they eat the burgers that you thought they eat. Whatever was like this certain minority of like where your food really came from. And what really happens. We actually did meet birds a couple of years ago. Um, and I haven't eaten chicken sets because it was, it was such an experience for me that I was like, and I, and I have hands, I have layer layer heads. And, um, the meat birds are a little Frankenstein birds, but still, I, I couldn't, it changed my perspective. I was like, Nope, I'm done with chicken.

Michaela:

Um, and so it's interesting how, when you do start taking on that burden or responsibility of really knowing where your food comes from, how you look at it differently. Yeah, definitely. Absolutely. And that, and that's the one thing that was instilled in me growing up, you know, you have such, such an appreciation for the circle of life or just for everything. Like when you're hunting, you're hunting your own food. There's just such a different respect for the animal and respect for the circle of life and just, there's so much more about it. And, um, and working for that. And then you're so much more thankful and appreciative of, uh, even just having, you know, a blessing to be able to put food on your table to be able to provide, um, organically and, and all those things, you know,

Michaela:

So lately and I was thinking about how, you know, what really spurred our conversation, and I'd like to shift gears a little bit here, and I even want to announce for the listeners that if you have children in the car now might be a time to press pause, um, and listen to the rest of this podcast when you're not with your kids in the car. But, um, one of the reasons we connected was to bring light to the topic of human trafficking, sex, sex trafficking. And, um, as we record today is actually world human trafficking day. Um, so this will come out after, but there's never, there's never been a better time to bring awareness to it. And I don't think it's ever too late. Um, and I know that you're actively involved in, um, kind of bringing awareness to the topic of modern slave trading sex trafficking. I'd love to switch gears a little bit and, um, just have you share a little bit about what you know about sex trafficking, and then we can kind of talk about how, um, people parents can, you know, take, take defensive action against this and be more aware and bring awareness to their communities.

Megan:

Yes. Um, so I mean, human trafficking can, can happen to anyone. Um, there's, there's no limit there. Unfortunately. Um, most majority of the time, you know, you're talking about children, uh, anyone from zero to 18 years old, um, and every, every child that's that's abducted or used in this disgusting evil ring, I mean, bought, sold, traded. These kids are being raped. They're being abused. They're being used for pornography is a huge one. Um, slavery sacrificing like evil rituals. It's, there's just no limits there. And it's absolutely horrible. Um, um, what is going on? The thing is it's been going on for centuries and I think we have, I think why it's so evident today and it's becoming, people are becoming more aware of it is because we have the means to do that. Whereas before social media, um, it, it was kind of something to easily keep covered up, but with people's platforms and, and search engines and just everything that's coming out and all the, um, like I said, the sources that we have these days, it's, it's a lot easier. Well, unfortunately, I mean, it goes both ways. It's easier for it to happen because most of the time it happens, um, through the internet or through social platforms, apps, all those things, but it's also made it easier to make people aware of it and bring it to light. So I think that's very important too. And I think it is a little bit of a catch 22 because also social media and the internet has made it easier for predators find

Michaela:

Victims as well. So it's kind of like as a parent, just being super mindful of what your children are doing on the internet. I used to think that, you know, it, it didn't affect boys. And after doing my own research, I'm coming to find out it affects, um, majority is children under 18. I read a horrific statistic that 20 sexually trafficked women, I can't call them women. Their children, girls, um, are forced to have sex up to 14 times per day. I mean, that is utterly disgusting to my mama heart. And, you know, it's, it's interesting because I think, yes, this has been happening has been happening in plain sight in our backyard Sacramento, um, which is not far from me is a huge hub for sex trafficking. But I think we have turned our blinders off to this kind of stuff because it does Hertz.

Michaela:

I think we have what we call in in psychotherapy terms. And also you've been seeing probably a lot on social media, cognitive dissonance. We, we, we have to detach from it because it's too much now is the time to stop detaching and to start bringing awareness to this. And I think, um, in talking with a lot of moms that I know they're like, I just want to hide my child for the next 18 years. And it feels that way. However, there is so much that you can do. I know for me, um, being in the psychotherapy world and working with victims who were sexually trafficked, um, in this area, one of the things that I started doing with my son very early on is having very open conversations about penises and vaginas and you know, talking about it, not having it be such a taboo topic, telling him, you know, that if anybody ever tries to take you, you kick, you scream, you rip, you shred them up, you do whatever you have to do.

Michaela:

You run because they want the children who are not going to be loud. They want the ones who are easy. And so, you know, we've taught our son. If you get dragged into a car, you're gone, that's it. So you do everything you have to do. And we've, we've really empowered him that if something's not sitting right in his belly, he can speak his truth. He can tell us. And by modeling that he can share with us, if something doesn't feel good to us and not responding to him negatively, that's showing him that he can do the same and advocate for himself in all other environments. So, you know, if, if he, if he learns early on, Hey, if mom and dad do something, I don't like, for example, the other day, my husband whispered something to me and he said, I don't like that.

Michaela:

You guys are telling secrets. And you know, back in the day, parents used to go it D you do what I, as I say, not as I do, I, you know, I don't care how you feel about that. We're adults, you're a kid. And instead we said, well, tell us about that. You know, what, what was bothering you about that? And we've created this environment where he knows if something doesn't feel right. He can say it, he can say that out loud. And I think that too many parents now don't give their children room to speak when something doesn't feel well. Because a lot of times when our kids say something, it's a direct reflection on us. And so we don't want that. We don't want them to tell us how they really feel, because that calls out our parenting. Right. But it's important. It's important to talk openly about, you know, sexual topics and the human body and things like that. And I, and I think a lot of parents don't do that.

Megan:

No, they don't. I agree. A hundred percent. Um, it, it, maybe they feel uncomfortable. It's, it's not like an easy conversation to discuss, you know, but it it's, it's so pertinent, like, especially, especially today. And I think there's a big difference between living in fear and being aware they're very different. And it's so important that we're aware. And by being aware, you don't have to live in fear. And, uh, I think that's important.

Michaela:

You know, we, we created this world, I think where, you know, we kind of buy into this victim mentality. Um, and we, and we definitely say things like, Oh, you know, bullying and this and that. But the reality is we need to be teaching our kids to be strong and to be brave. And I, and I shared this phrase with you before, and I'll share it again. My policy is, do no harm, but take no shit. Um, so, you know, I think that when we teach kids that like, Oh, you know that person's just being a bully to you. I mean, I'm, I'm not for bullying. I think that is wrong. But I also think that it's important that we teach our kid how to stand up for themselves against the bully and how to not, you know, to feel confident in their own skin and confident with themselves rather than like you poor thing you've been bullied. Whoa is, you know, that is not the way to raise your child. I mean, and I'm, I'm sharing my opinion here. Obviously parents have different thoughts in different ways, but all that does from a psychotherapy standpoint is create this notion and idea that we are weak and that we are not capable. And I would never want that to be the messaging that I'm sharing with my child.

Megan:

Right. Right. Absolutely. I, and it's funny, I was just having this conversation last night. I met my parents for supper and we were having that conversation. And, and I mean, like I said, I, I grew up in the church and the way I was raised, everything was very passive. You know, everything's very, non-confrontational from the other cheek. And I think there's a lot to be said for that. And there's different ways to approach a situation, but, and like I said, this was my opinion. So I was, I was, um, kind of at heads with my, with my parents. Uh, it's personal, but like, I, I don't think anyone should ever have to be bullied or attacked and not be capable or feel, feel enabled to, to stand their ground. And, and you can do that. I mean, there's different ways to do that. There's different ways to approach a situation, obviously. Um, but I think it's very important to your stress and to, to, to educate, especially children that it's okay to, to stand your ground. It's okay. To, and like I said, there's different ways to go about that that are right and wrong, but just letting them know that, that you have the right to defend yourself. And, uh, yeah, I think that's important.

Michaela:

Absolutely. And one of the things that you kind of just touched on, which I'm glad, cause I'd love to shift gears to this for a minute is, um, you know, that you, you had independent thoughts of your parents. Um, and I think that, uh, you know, one of the things that I've been seeing as an interesting revolution and I'll, and I'll just say, I'm so tired of being called a conspiracy theorist lately for having an independent thought, um, is the rise of Q and, um, and just kind of this idea of thinking interdependently and critical thinking. Um, can you share a little bit about what Q is? Um, you know, some, some people maybe who are tuned into this podcast right now, we're going, okay. They mentioned conspiracy theory, I'm checking out. I'm not really sure, but this idea is, um, I think is important to bring some light to, and, and I, uh, have traditionally been pretty nervous to talk about things like this on my social media platform, where you have that kind of bold bravery. And so can you share a little bit about what the idea of Q is and how that pertains to critical thinking? Right.

Megan:

So I, like I said, I, my platform's usually based around the outdoors and, and encouraging people to get outside, but I'm also very outspoken about, about certain topics that I'm passionate about back in. And I've, I just, like you said, I've always been like one of those people, I'm like, Oh my goodness, it's a conspiracy theory. Or do you hear that, blah, blah, blah. Like, they're starting to believe this. And, um, I've always kind of thought that way and was taught that way. And back in February, when they, I watched the, uh, out of the shadows documentary and that really hit me in a different way, I kind of was like, well, this is a conspiracy theory, but, but what if, what if, what if this is all true? Like, it was just, it kept tugging at me and I'm like, you know what, I'm just, I'm going to do my own research.

Megan:

I'm going to do my own studying all that stuff. And then COVID hit. And then, uh, the fall of gumball documentary came out and just all of it, all of these things. And so I'm like, you, what, I'm going down this rabbit hole before I knew it, I'm like months into research and doing all this stuff because I, I wanted to know for myself, I, I got, I think I got to the point where I was like, so tired of being fed information. I'm like, what if these documentaries are right? What if, what if Q is trying to warn us or just not just kind of awaken us and let us know what's going on cute for anyone that doesn't know, it's kind of like a, no one knows who, who Q is. It's just kind of these Q drops that have started. I think it was 2017.

Megan:

Um, but it's just to awaken the masses to the reality of our rural, you know, they, they want to want to show us, you know, who's controlling it, who's behind everything and, and everything that was coming up, everything that I came across there was, it got to the point where there was just too much evidence to deny it anymore. And that just really hit me, that there were too many things that, that added up there were too many things that were being exposed in February. That turned out to be true. Everything that was coming out was happening. And I was like, Holy cow, this is all, like I said, there's just too much evidence to deny it. And now like, I'm the one, that's this crazy conspiracy They want, they label it that because they want people to think that it's taboo.

Michaela:

Like you're crazy. Yeah.

Megan:

You know, it's like when people are freethinkers, people are thinking for themselves and doing their own research. And now all of a sudden they can't control what people are thinking and what they're programming us to do, and to think, and programming fear and programming, all these things. And they're panicking. I think it's just,

Michaela:

I don't know, as a kid, I, I was always the kid that, that asked, but why, but why? And I was always getting the response just because Kayla, just because I think my parents were just driven nuts with my yeah. Endless questioning. So ask Jeeves and Google like changed. But, um, you know, I've, I've often said on this podcast that I'm not, I'm not red, I'm not blue, I'm purple some blend of in between. Um, because I, I never take face value as it is. It's just always been my personality. And so, um, what happened for me in the world of Q is that some of the stuff that was happening in the nation, just, you know, pur highly intelligent people that I know were just lining up. And I was like, well, how was this make it, why are you not asking why? Like, this doesn't make any sense to me?

Michaela:

Like, what about this? And what about that? And what about this? And people were just like, just because, and I'm like, no, I'm not accepting just because that is not a reasonable answer for me. And so I started reaching out to people in a smaller circle and, um, I've, I've actually really, so I, I lost my, my, my big Instagram account. I had, it was hacked. And I've talked about it on here with thousands of followers I've restarted and I've kept it really small. And I'm really grateful for the timing of that because now more than ever, I feel like having a small pod of people, um, around me, because I haven't had a lot of patients for an I, and I'm a very open minded person, but lately after researching the way I've been researching and finding what I've been finding, I haven't had a lot of patience for people who aren't like minded.

Michaela:

Um, so I'm glad that I don't have this huge social media platform because I would be like, totally intolerant, just get outta here, just go by, you know? Um, and that does not fit my quote unquote brand with, with the books and the podcasts and everything that I do. And I'm being full disclosure because this is how I feel. Once you start down this journey and you start to realize there are too many coincidences, and when that happens, it's like scientifically proven that then it's not, it can't, it it's proven at that point. It becomes fact when that many things line up, that's how science works. So for me, um, you know, being a very independent thinker and going down this path, I think once you awaken, it's really hard to have conversations with those who aren't woke. It's just really challenging because I find myself going within and just saying, you know what?

Michaela:

I don't need to, if they come around and they know where to find me, if they come around, they want to have a conversation about it. I will. And I just kind of look at them and smile, and I'm like, it's okay, you'll get there when you get there. And I, it took me a long time to get there. I remember watching fall cabal. It took me almost 10 days to finish that video because it broke my heart. It shattered every notion that I had, I could not fathom that these evil things could be happening in our world. I, it was cognitive dissonance to the nth degree. I was completely like, Nope, this can't be happening. Nope, Nope, Nope. It took me a long time and I realize everybody's going to be on their own journey and they're going to do it in their own time being.

Michaela:

And if they don't, that's okay. Maybe in this lifetime, they're not meant to that's okay. But I can't be, I can't take on that burden. And I find myself, um, you know, with my friends who aren't, I'm having lighthearted conversations about the weather and where they like to travel next. And I keep it really surfaced because I am finding, um, more than ever. I'm rallying my small tribe. And, um, and it's not out of naivety. It's the opposite. I was having a conversation with a friend the other day and I'm like, gosh, I feel like this immense desire to have to listen to the alternative because I'm liking, I'm a balanced person and I don't want to be judgmental and I don't want to rule out. And I want to be, I don't want to become the person that isn't open to listening. And she said, but again, 99% of your messaging has come from that direction.

Michaela:

And what you're experiencing is what they want you to experience, which is that, that is the only message you should be hearing. And that there is no other message. And it's so true. It's so true. And so, um, I encourage anybody to, if, you know, if, if you have listened to this podcast or you have seen something on social media, or there's even just been something in general, that's not been sitting right in your belly, like you've been seeing stuff unfolding in your family and your friend, and you're like why or in the nation, or with COVID ask about why go to an alternative search engine, like a kosher.org and start to do some research on, on what all this is about and, and seek answers for yourself. Cause that's what Q is. And that's what I love about it. It's not telling you what to believe. It's saying here's some information if it peaks your interest and you're curious, go do more research,

Megan:

Right? It's encouraging. And to think, you know, form for it, here's information, we're still asking you to form your own opinion, but it's like deep down. I feel like deep down in your soul. I feel like everybody has got to know like something's off. Something's not right. Something's not sitting well seeing where, where our world has been and where we're our nation's headed. And it's just like so many people are searching. And I think that's why this has just blown up because so many people just have that unsettling feeling. And so many people are searching for answers. And, um, and they're willing to give you, these answers are willing to give this information to you. And yet still encourage you. You know, we're not telling you what believe, what to believe, but just, just go find out for yourself. And I think that's, I think that's really respectful.

Megan:

I think that says a lot about you and about this quote unquote, you know, conspiracy theory. And, um, like I said, I, all of this, it was kind of like a say, like you said, you were just like, this is not, I can't believe this, this isn't cognitive dissonance. Like you're, you're just, you can't process everything. And it takes a long time. It takes a while. And that's kind of where I was. And the more and more what I think what really did me in was the control over the social media platforms and seeing them banned and delete videos and things coming out. I mean, there's always been nonsense. There's always been crazy people. There's always been crazy theories on YouTube and, and different channels. I mean, for, for the past couple of decades. So why all the sudden are they deleting

Michaela:

These videos or labeling them as sensitive content or fact checking? Like, to me, that was what sent me over the top. I was like, all right, something's not right here. If they're going to all this trouble to delete all this information, all of a sudden, it's not that that's kind of what was my turning point, I guess you could say, I saw a meme. It was awesome. It said, congratulations, Twitter by banning, um, 7,000 accounts and the, and the hashtag Q Anon, you just confirmed that. You're scared. It's so true. Like if, if you're really just thinking that's just some crazy conspiracy theory, then why are you going to that extreme? Because Q Anon, isn't hurting anybody. It's a group of anonymous people nationwide who are asking why. So if you're scared of that and you're banning that, then you just delete it. Yeah, yeah.

Michaela:

Um, yeah, it's pretty, it's pretty mind blowing, but you know, it's funny as, as stuff comes out more and more every day, I'm just so not, I mean, at this point I'm like figures yep. Saw that come in, you know, like at this point it's just like, it's, it's all there. You know what I mean? All unfolding exactly. As it mean you would expect it to. And then there's still people that aren't woke that are like, Ooh. And I'm like, yeah, poor thing. You'll get there. I've been there. I was there three months ago. Well, I may have lost half of my listener base at this point, but that's okay because the people who are here are supposed to be, um, I thank you so much for being willing to, to have this dialogue and having the courage to have this dialogue and, um, you know, putting yourself out there.

Michaela:

I know there's trolls on the internet. I know that you have, um, an open account that probably deals with a lot of that. So I commend you and, um, I'm glad that you're doing what you're doing. I'm appreciative of that. And, uh, for those listeners who are like just kind of going what just happened, um, I'm going to include links to some information about human trafficking and modern slave labor, as well as an anonymous tip line. Um, we're going to link the buildout doors for those of you who might want to get involved in Megan's awesome. Cause, um, and also learn more about, um, firearms in general. And then lastly, I will put, um, two pertinent videos. I recommend everyone start with out of the shadows. And if that peaks your interest, then Moda fall of cabal. But I will give the explicit lyrics warning that that is a lot to take. So, um, I wouldn't drive jumped down that rabbit hole until you are ready to wake. Um, but Megan, is there anything else that you would like to share before we go? Um, not really. I think you did a really good job in covering

Megan:

That, running everything that's been, you know, on my heart and on my mind. And, and as far as encouraging listeners, just to, uh, don't settle for just being fed information from whoever it may be from us, from the news, from whoever, but just encourage them to, to look in, look into things deeper and, um, learn for themselves and form opinions for themselves. For sure. I love that. And I have great news, which is that it is still recording. I've been checking it like every three minutes. My conspiracy theorist mind now is worried that if I mentioned certain words, it's gonna just be obliterated by bill Gates. Delete. We'll see if it's actually there when we hang up. Hopefully. So thank you so much, Megan and I'm and I'm glad that we're connected and I'm sure that this is going to spur a lot of dialogue and we will have you back on the podcast to talk more about these things. Awesome. Thank you so much. Take care. Yep. You too.